What is Hyperinsulinemia

Often mistaken for diabetes, hyperinsulinemia is a potentially life threatening condition within the human body. As the name suggests, the condition is marked by too much insulin, specifically too much insulin circulating throughout the body. This causes many of the same symptoms are diabetes and can cause much of the same damage to internal organs, extremities, and cognition. It can be co-morbid, that is to exist alongside, type 2 diabetes, but that isn’t always the case. It isn’t always a chronic condition and can sometimes be treated in a manner that allows you your life back very quickly.

One of the most common causes of this condition is consumption of too many refined sugars. People who eat a very modern diet and are often on the run will sometimes get this condition. In this case, the solution is to change your diet, focusing on eating better foods. This sounds daunting, but many supermarkets and fast food chains have begun to offer options that are higher in protein in fiber and avoid the use of refined sugars. After a few weeks of checking labels and looking into nutrition information most people find that they are able to make the change without too much of an impact to their lifestyle.

Less common causes of this condition are a number of different metabolic diseases. These different diseases will generally not just affect the amount of insulin in the body and the ability to process glucose, but can also cause excess or decreased production of hormones and other important substances within the body. A doctor will be able to perform blood tests when these conditions present themselves to find out more information and make a plan for treatment. It is important if you find yourself suffering from any unexplained conditions that seem to be similar to diabetes for you to go in and see your doctor.

Hyperinsulinemia is not something that you can diagnose or treat at home. It doesn’t always react to strict diet control and some treatments for diabetes will actually make it worse. If your doctor exhausts all of the possible non-invasive treatment routes and you are still having issues you may find yourself being put on Metformin or other medications to help control the levels of insulin in your body. Treatment of this type is generally not permanent and you will need a follow-up every year to determine if you still need medication.